Website will be back online soon. Currently no online orders are accepted due to focusing on getting our shop established and with the volume of events we are attending.
You can still browse our catalogue of games and buy/sell from us at our shop in YORK, or at one of the many events. Please "LIKE" out facebook page to keep updated about events etc.

Welcome to Sorethumb Retro Video Games

Search results for 'Toshinden URA'

Items 21 to 30 of 120 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction
  1. Imported Sega Saturn  ( Loose ,White ) all leads, 1x controller  (  Saturn )

    Imported Sega Saturn ( Loose ,White ) all leads, 1x controller ( Saturn )

    £100.00

    The Japanese Saturn was released in November 1994, just six weeks ahead of its rival, Sony's PlayStation.[1] Approximately 170,000 machines were sold the first day the console went on sale. In a special Game Machine Cross Review in May 1995, Famicom Tsūshin would score the Sega Saturn console a 24 out of 40.[15] Many of the games that made the Saturn popular in Japan, such as the Sakura Taisen series and various role-playing video games, were never released in foreign territories as it was assumed at Sega of America and Sega of Europe that they were not appealing to a Western audience. The last commercial licensed release in Japan and last official game for the system was Yuukyuu Gensoukyoku Hozonban Perpetual Collection, released by MediaWorks on December 4, 2000. Does not come with a stepdown convertor, Learn More
  2. Imported Sega Saturn  ( Loose ,Grey ) all leads, 1x controller  (  Saturn )

    Imported Sega Saturn ( Loose ,Grey ) all leads, 1x controller ( Saturn )

    £90.00

    The Japanese Saturn was released in November 1994, just six weeks ahead of its rival, Sony's PlayStation.[1] Approximately 170,000 machines were sold the first day the console went on sale. In a special Game Machine Cross Review in May 1995, Famicom Tsūshin would score the Sega Saturn console a 24 out of 40.[15] Many of the games that made the Saturn popular in Japan, such as the Sakura Taisen series and various role-playing video games, were never released in foreign territories as it was assumed at Sega of America and Sega of Europe that they were not appealing to a Western audience. The last commercial licensed release in Japan and last official game for the system was Yuukyuu Gensoukyoku Hozonban Perpetual Collection, released by MediaWorks on December 4, 2000. Does not come with a stepdown convertor, Learn More
  3. Jordan vs Bird: One on One ( Mega Drive )

    Jordan vs Bird: One on One ( Mega Drive )

    £3.00

    Two of the greatest icons of the Golden Age of the NBA match up in this game. On one side, the spectacular dunks of Michael Jordan of the Chicago Bulls; on the other, Larry Bird's incredible accuracy from the outside. While Bird feels right home at the three-point contest, where five racks with five balls each are placed around the three-point arc and the player must pick each ball and throw in the the best timing possible to get as many points as possible during the 60 second window, only Jordan has the air-time to perform on the slam dunk contest, where the player has a number of dunks at his disposal, each requiring different timing to get the best score from all three attempts from the judges, and win the competition. While they are two completely different players, they can still go one-on-one on a half-court match, played to points or with a time duration. Can Bird's stealing and outside shooting ability be a match to Jordan's speed and jumping abilities? Learn More
  4. Andre Agassi Tennis  ( Master System )

    Andre Agassi Tennis ( Master System )

    £3.00

    A game endorsed by the American player who stunned the tennis world in the early 90s with his "Image is everything" looks, sporting long hair, earrings and colorful shirts, Andre Agassi Tennis includes eight players (male and female and as as expected, only Agassi is a real player) rated according to movement speed and both accuracy and strength on serve, backhand and forehand. Gameplay features all the usual moves: smashes, passing shots, volleys and all kinds of backhand and forehand plays, but unlike other games, precise positioning and timing are crucial to avoid hitting the ball outside the court, swinging the racket into thin air or more embarrassing, let the ball hit you on the head. Three courts are available: Grass, Clay and Indoor (Sega versions add a fourth, Hard), but the differences between them are minimal. Game modes change according to the version, with the 16-bit versions including a "Skins" game, where each point is worth a sum of money based on the number of times the ball was hit. Learn More
  5. Jurassic Park ( Master System )

    Jurassic Park ( Master System )

    £7.00

    One of many games based on the 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park, the version for Sega's 8-bit systems combines side-scrolling shooting action and platforming levels. In each of the five stages of the game, one escaped dinosaur species must be recaptured. Each level begins with a side-scrolling driving section. Dinosaurs attack the car and must be fend off by firing at them with a crosshair. If the player survives long enough, a boss battle against an especially powerful dinosaur follows. After the completion of the driving section the level continues with a platform section. The player must jump, duck and climb to survive moving lifts, floors that will crumble under his feet, environmental hazards like acid drops, steam leaks or giant boulders and more. Dinosaurs will of course also stand in the way, but can be defeated by using several weapons: a rifle, a grenade launcher and hand grenades. Navigating the often maze-like levels will lead to the dinosaur that must be captured and a corresponding boss fight. The first four levels (featuring a Velociraptor, Pteranodon, Triceratops and Brachiosaurus) can be tackled in any order, but the final level, featuring the Tyrannosaurus Rex, is only unlocked when the others have been completed. Learn More
  6. Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar ( Master System )

    Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar ( Master System )

    £24.00

    Following the defeat of the evil triad in the previous three Ultima games, the world of Sosaria changed beyond recognition: continents rose and sank, and new cities were built, heralding the advent of a different civilization. Unified by the reign of the benevolent monarch Lord British, the new world was renamed Britannia. Lord British wished to base people's well-being on the ethical principles of Truth, Love, and Courage, proclaiming the Eight Virtues (Honesty, Compassion, Valor, Justice, Sacrifice, Honor, Spirituality, and Humility) as the ideal everyone should strive for. The person who could accomplish full understanding and realization of these virtues would serve as a spiritual leader and a moral example for the inhabitants of Britannia; he alone would be able to obtain holy artifacts, descend into the Stygian Abyss, and access the Codex of Ultimate Wisdom. This person is the Avatar. The fourth game in the Ultima series features an improved game engine, with color graphics and enhanced character interaction: the player can have conversations with non-playable characters by typing names of various topics. However, the main difference between Ultima IV and its predecessors in the series (as well as other role-playing games) lies in the game's objectives and the ways to fulfill them. Instead of building up a character by any means possible in order to face a villain in the end of the game, in Ultima IV the player is trying to become the Avatar, a role model for people. This means upholding the Eight Virtues, basically trying to become a better person. Making morally conscious decisions and helping other people is not done expecting a material reward, but because it is the actual goal of the game and the main focus of its gameplay. The game frowns on behavior typical of most other RPGs, such as backstabbing fleeing enemies or picking up everything that isn't nailed down even if it does not belong to the protagonist. This different approach established the game's reputation as the first "true" Ultima, influencing the design philosophy of later installments and the overall spirit of the series. Character creation is done by choosing responses to morally ambiguous questions. Each of the Eight Virtues corresponds to a character class; by determining the player's personal priorities in the virtues, the game assigns a class and a starting location for the Avatar. After emerging in Britannia, the player is free to explore it in various ways (on foot, moongate teleportation, on horseback, by ship, etc.). Certain items must be collected in any order to enter the Stygian Abyss and complete the game. The Avatar also has to reach the highest level in all virtues. This is achieved by various means: donating blood increases Sacrifice, not fleeing from combat increases Valor, etc. The process, however, is not irreversible: should the Avatar overpay a blind seller, he gains Compassion points; should he, on the other hand, cheat the seller by underpaying, his level in several virtues would decrease. These unorthodox features of the game co-exist with plenty of traditional RPG elements, such as dungeons to explore and hostile monsters to kill. Enemies are encountered on the world map as well as in dungeons; combat takes place on separate top-down screens, allowing player-controlled and enemy parties freely move on them. Characters accumulate experience points and level up, gaining higher amount of hit points and access to stronger magic spells. Like in the previous installments of the series, world map, town exploration and combat are presented from a top-down view, while the dungeons are pseudo-3D and are explored from first-person perspective. Ultima IV also introduces several new gameplay features to the series and role-playing games in general. A number of initially non-playable characters living in various areas of the game world are able to to join the party and fight alongside the hero, replacing traditional player-generated characters or mercenaries and adventurers available only in special locations. Additional new elements include buying and combining reagents in order to cast spells, unique items such as grapple to pass through mountains, puzzle rooms in dungeons, and others. Learn More
  7. World Championship Soccer - World Cup Italia '90 ( Master System)

    World Championship Soccer - World Cup Italia '90 ( Master System)

    £3.00

    This soccer game lets you choose a team representing one of twenty-four countries around the world to participate in the World Championship tournament, which is identical to the real 1990 World Cup.

    Once you pick your team you can also select which players you want on the field, so that you can round out the team's strengths and weaknesses. Also provided are modes for single exhibition matches, either against the computer or against a friend.

    The action is viewed from above with large player sprites. Violent play is encouraged as there are no free kicks. The gameplay is rather simple: you can only control the player closest to the ball, and many soccer rules (such as penalty flags and offsides) are missing.

    Learn More
  8. Super Space Invaders ( Master System )

    Super Space Invaders ( Master System )

    £5.00

    Remember that arcade classic Invaders? Well this game takes it to the next level with harder aliens, bosses, power ups, and a variety of scenery! Invaders come in several configurations for you to try to blast, and power-ups help you with more weapons to choose from. Learn More
  9. Golfamania ( Master System )

    Golfamania ( Master System )

    £3.50

    Golfamania is a golfing simulation game where players play on an 18 hole golf course with all the rules and scoring like in the real game. Within the game there are 4 different modes to play on that includes Practice, Match Play, Stroke Play, and Pro Tournament. In Practice a single player can play any of the 18 holes available. Match Play is 2 player mode against human or computer. Stroke Play is the player can play up to 4 others that can include 1 computer player. In this mode the character skill can increase in 3 different areas that are power, accuracy, and luck with the 6 different characters available. The main mode is the Pro Tournament and it is where the player plays against over 30 computer players (all playing different holes) with the objective to score lower than the other players (as per the rules of golf). Based on performance the player can earn experience points (XP) that they can use to upgrade the power, accuracy, and luck of the character for future tournaments. Some of the holes have awards like ‘longest drive’ and ‘hole in one’ awards that can earn bonus XP. Regardless of the mode the game is played in the same sort of way. The player selects a character (the selection depends on the mode) and then sets up the character by naming and picking their style. In all modes but Practice the player must pick 3 golf clubs that they must remove from their selection of 17 different clubs (1-5 wood, 1-9 Iron, Pitching Wedge, Sand Wedge, and Putter). When playing the player is presented with a top down view where the player lines up the shot and the location on the golf ball they want to hit (for spin). Then the player selects the club they want to use (all go varying distances). When that is all done the player must play the skill part of the game, where they are presented with a power bar that has a marker that going is up and down along it. The player must stop the marker on the red area in the centre of the power bar to get a good hit (with the center been a perfect hit)and if this area is missed the ball will only travel about 20 yards (compared to about 100+ yards of a good hit). The amount of red that is on the power bar depends on the golf club used. To help the player the distance of the shot can be lowered in exchange for a lower marker speed and can be used for shots closer to the hole (very helpful for putter shots). The game uses battery backed RAM save to continue play later. Learn More
  10. Casino Games  ( Master System )

    Casino Games ( Master System )

    £3.50

    In Casino Games the player can visit a Casino with $500 in the pocket where they spend it on casino games. The games come in 3 different categories that include card game, slot machine, and pinball. After the player picks there gender and their surname they are greeted by the woman at the information desk. The player can then pick if they want to enter an account number if the player has played before. If not the default $500 is given and the player is on there way to play some games. The categories and games available are: Card Games Poker – The player plays one of the four CPU players available ranging from the easy player, Nancy, to the hardest player, Charley. The player is presented with a one on one game using the five-card-draw poker where the player, after playing the ante, can Bet, Pass, or Fold for a round, before replacing unwanted cards for the 2nd and final round of betting. The more skilled the opponent the harder it is to bluff them and they will try to bluff more themselves. Blackjack – The standard game against the dealer where the objective is to score higher then the dealer to but not exceed 21 points for the value of all the players’ cards. The player can Hit (get another card) or Stand (keep the cards) . It uses the casino rules like Double Down (if the score lower then 12 then the player can double the bet but have a maximum of one more card), Split (turn two matching cards into 2 separate hands), and Insurance (player wins if the dealer gets 21 with two cards after playing extra). Bets can be between $10 and $100. Baccarat – Player tries to beat the dealers score by using only the last digit of the total of the cards (i.e 10+4 = 4) if the score is under six then the player gets dealt one more card. If the players score is over six or seven then the dealer may get an extra card based on complex rules. Eight and above then no one gets an extra card. Bets can be between $10 and $100. Slot Machine There are old standard fruit slot machines with 3 lines each. The player picks a slot machine that come in $1, $5, $25, $50, or $100 per token. There is one token per line to a maximum of 3 lines after which the player will be increasing the payout per line up to 3 times (9 tokens max). The payouts range from 1 Cherry (2 tokens) to Lucky Sevens (50 tokens). Pinball: After choosing the table slope of Gentle, Middle, or Steep (slow to fast) the player is presented with a standard 3 ball pinball table named CASINOGAMES with drop-targets, bumpers, rollovers, and 2 levels of flippers. The plunger strength is based on timing and flippers are controlled by left and B. There is only one table to play is no money to be won. There is no amount to play to, however, if the player runs out of money then it is game over. When the player has won an amount then they can get an account number to password save the game. Learn More

Items 21 to 30 of 120 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction
Website by Simulant.